Zoetrope-paper
Zoetrope-paper
Do-It-Yourself paper instrument consisiting of a magic drum and 6 different ribbons with patterns.
This is a kind of ancient theater. (From the Greek words zoe "life" and bum, "the turn") Also known as Zootrop, Daedalum, Wundertrommel or Wheel of Life. This device produces the illusion of motion. It consists of an open cylinder with 11-13 slits cut vertically which spins around the central axis. In the inner surface of the cylinder is the replacable band with sequences on it. When the cylinder spins and the user looks through the slits watching inside the cylinder, can see the ribbon with the pattern. Based on the succession of the rapid change of still images, the brain produces the illusion of movement. The tapes with sequences are included, but the user can develop new ones, as well.
First described in Europe by William George Horner in 1834, popular from the 1860's.
€ 9,00
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Teleidoscope
Teleidoscope
Copper, optical glass, optical ball. H 21 cm / 8.26 inch, diameter 2 cm / 0.78 inch
€ 26,00
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Praxinoscope
Praxinoscope
Old-time designed, classical instrument consisting of a magic drum (H 24 d 20 cm // H 9,44 d 7,87 inch) and 8-band paperfilm phase ribbons in special giftbox.
((22x22x28,5 cm // 8,66x8,66x H 11,22 inch))
Material: copper, wood, paper.
video: http://youtu.be/TlgcK1Azd3E
The praxinoscope, invented in 1877 by the French Charles Reynaud, was the first device to overcome the picture distortion caused by viewing through moving slots. The image produced is more brilliant than with any previous device. Because of this advantage, it quickly replaced the zoetrope in popularity. A band of pictures is placed inside a shallow outer cylinder, so that each picture is reflected by the inner set of mirrors. The number of mirrors is equal to the number of pictures, and the images of the pictures are viewed in the mirrors. When the outer cylinder rotates, the quick succession of reflected pictures gives the illusion of a moving picture. Using this principle, Reynaud found a way to project the series of pictures onto a screen. He called this the "Theatre Optique." A standard praxinoscope, like the one above, can only accomodate a second or two of animation because of the limited number of pictures it contains. Reynaud's "Theatre Optique" used a long roll of paper to increase the number of pictures, and was therefore able to create a much longer show for an audience.
€ 168,00
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Phenakistoscope
Phenakistoscope
In 1832, Belgian physicist Joseph Plateau and his sons introduced the phenakistoscope ("spindle viewer"). It was also invented independently in the same year by Simon von Stampfer of Vienna, Austria, who called his invention a stroboscope. Plateau's inspiration had come primarily from the work of Michael Faraday and Peter Mark Roget (the compiler of Roget's Thesaurus). Faraday had invented a device he called "Michael Faraday's Wheel," that consisted of two discs that spun in opposite directions from each other. From this, Plateau took another step, adapting Faraday's wheel into a toy he later named the phenakistoscope.
How it works: The phenakistoscope uses the persistence of motion principle to create an illusion of motion. The phenakistoscope consisted of two discs mounted on the same axis. When viewed in a mirror , the pictures on will appear to move. Circle diameter: 19,5 cm / 7.67 inch. Created solely upon request!
€ 55,00
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Copper Zoetrope
Copper Zoetrope
Vision phantasm from chariot of doktor Parnassus! It consists of an old-time designed, classical magic drum (H 22,5 d 18 cm / H 8,85 d 7,08) and 6 band paperfilm phase ribbons in special giftbox. (22x22x28,5 cm 8,66x8,66x11,22 inch) Created solely upon request!
€ 122,00
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Ombrocinema
Ombrocinema
Created solely upon request!
€ 81,00
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